September ACTive Play Digest

The ACTive Play Digest will be forwarded in hard copy to all Playgroup contacts around the middle of each month. It contains a summary of articles that were published on the website in the last month as well as other important information about upcoming events, etc.

Click here or on the photos above to see the Digest dated September 2017 in larger format.

The Digests can also be found in our ACTive Play archives here.

Mighty Movers CBR #8 – Mud Pies

Do your kids love oozy, squishy mud?

Our latest Active Play Idea is #8 Mud Pies. Find out why mud makes kids happy and develops their creativity and senses.

Mighty Movers is a project of the Bluearth Foundation, delivered in partnership with ACT Playgroups Association and supported by ACT Health. We hope it helps you and your families Move More, Sit Less.  You can follow Mighty Movers on Facebook fb.me/MightyMoversCBR and “Like” this idea there too. Or, if you’d like to join the Mighty Movers online program simply:

  • send an email to nsadlier@bluearth.org with the subject ‘Mighty Movers’, and
  • include your name and the age of your child/children.

Bluearth will send you a bit more information about the program, and then each week you’ll be sent an active play idea that’s easy to set-up at home or your playgroup – using items that can be found mostly around the home.

If you have any questions about the Mighty Movers program – please email Nicole on nsadlier@bluearth.org

Mighty Movers CBR #7 – Batter Up

Our latest Active Play Idea is #7 Batter Up. This idea has been tried and tested across Canberra and is sure to get your playgroup and early childhood families moving.

Create a Baby Friendly version of this activity by tying a beach ball to a piece of elastic and either hold or suspend it over your baby. Your baby will will try to reach towards the ball and grab it, grasp it or kick it. This idea works for babies on their backs and for sitting.

Mighty Movers is a project of the Bluearth Foundation, delivered in partnership with ACT Playgroups Association and supported by ACT Health. We hope it helps you and your families Move More, Sit Less.  You can follow Mighty Movers on Facebook fb.me/MightyMoversCBR and “Like” this idea there too. Or, if you’d like to join the Mighty Movers online program simply:

  • send an email to nsadlier@bluearth.org with the subject ‘Mighty Movers’, and
  • include your name and the age of your child/children.

Bluearth will send you a bit more information about the program, and then each week you’ll be sent an active play idea that’s easy to set-up at home or your playgroup – using items that can be found mostly around the home.

If you have any questions about the Mighty Movers program – please email Nicole on nsadlier@bluearth.org

Childhood Movement

When a child moves, they are not only developing a strong body, they are also developing a strong brain.

Babies, toddlers and preschoolers find it very hard to sit still, don’t they? The constant need to move can perplex or or at times frustrate us. Why can’t she stay in the one place while eating her food? Why won’t he sit in my lap until the end of the story?

The thing is, this drive to move is as nature intended. It’s not a sign of developmental challenges for your little one.  It’s simply evidence that the need to understand the world is of greater importance than their desire to please you.

You see, the process of learning doesn’t just happen in the brain. It’s the brain and body working in partnership that creates true learning. Especially in the early years of life, and especially for older children who are experiencing challenges with learning, attention, behaviour, coordination or emotional resilience.

I urge you to be an advocate for children’s movement. Value it in your homes, at your playgroup, and in later years, in the classroom. Learning and movement are intertwined.

Clare Crew – Early Childhood Educator

Clare Crew from Thriving Children, is an early childhood and inclusive education teacher who specialises in the brain-body connection. She helps the children the system leaves behind, those with learning, attention and behavioural challenges. Her message is simple; children need more movement and play in the early years of life. And when we’re able to deliver this, children begin thriving.